Kashyap Deorah Entrepreneur, Bestselling Author ep 54

Kashyap Deorah is a serial entrepreneur, angel investor and a bestselling author of the book “The Golden Tap”; which deals with the much hyped world of startups in India. In this interview, Kashyap and I talk about his writing process, the support received from his publisher, timing of the launch of the book and takeaways for writers who are looking to get their book published. Finally, we talk about how and why he ended up writing this book.

Shownotes are available at www.mykitaab.in/golden-tap

 

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Updates: Print Book, Nanowrimo and Sequel

As we approach the middle of November, it is getting a little challenging to hit my goal for nanowrimo: I am writing the sequel to NRI: Now, Returned to India. Which also means that I have had to cut down on other writing, and somehow, I was unable to post on this blog fell into that bucket. I have learnt that bureaucrats refer to such errors as “administrative lapse.”

Lapses, or oversight aside, it is time for me to voice my concerns, share my updates and learn from the readers’ experiences, and the best way to do all of that is to write this post. So here goes…

First and foremost, I am very excited to announce that the print version of NRI:Now, Returned to India is available on Amazon. After several weeks of redrafts, edits and adding new content, one fine day, I was finally able to get the book released. In a subsequent post, I will write about my experience with both Kindle Direct Publishing and Createsapce. My wife (who is managing the marketing and the release of the book in India) has finalized a printer and we are in the last steps of finalizing the distribution of the book. More on that in a subsequent post.

Three things really delayed the publishing of the print version of the book, and that hurt us quite a bit. First of all, I was not happy with the editing. I hired an editor who charged top dollar, but the output was far from satisfactory. And that meant re-visiting the whole process: look for an editor, finalize them, send the manuscript, rounds of review, etc.). Secondly, we moved to Bengaluru, something that I have mentioned in the past. A career move at the most unexpected time really threw our publishing plans out of gear. And last but not the least, we are yet to get an ISBN from the National Agency for ISBN in India – even after applying four times over the past six months. In subsequent posts, I will write about copyright and ISBN so that others may benefit from my experience, rather, avoid the kind of mistakes that I have made.

As the year draws to a close, I would like to throw a few ideas on which I plan to write my subsequent posts in this blog.

a. Copyright process in India

b. Getting the ISBN in India (there is quite a bit of information available on this on the Internet, I would specifically like to share my experience)

c. KDP and Createspace- experience of a self published author from India (and tax implications!)

d. Printing, Pricing, Distribution of books – the DIY way.

e. Time travel- my path to becoming a self published author.

f. Guest posts. I think a new ‘voice’ will add both some spice and bring some fresh air to my blog. Volunteers are welcome!

g. And finally, a quick update on the MRP per page index for the last six months of the year.

I hope that the above schedule will keep you interested in my blog, and more importantly, you will find the future posts relevant and informative. In the meantime, Happy Reading, and for those of us who are aiming to hit the 50,000 word target this month, Happy Writing!

Four Weeks Off Schedule for Print Book Release

A man takes up a new job. A month later he moves from Gurgaon to Bangalore. Wife, a four month old puppy, and a truck with worldly possessions follows. The very next week, our man is back in Gurgaon, and will be stationed there for the next two months. Wife is fuming, because she is left to fend for herself and the puppy, who she didn’t want in the first case. The household goods arrive, the car goes missing in transit. Such is life.

This could very well be the theme of my new book, because it sounds like Amol Dixit’s story all over again. Unfortunately, this is the reality that I am faced with. Not surprisingly, my present situation has thrown the launch schedule for the print version of Now, Returned to India completely out of gear. I am officially four weeks behind schedule.

But now, things are looking positive. With a four day holiday coming up next week, the final edits and a proof copy of the book should be sent back to the printer. By early next month, Now, Returned to India should hit the online bookstores.

As any project manager will tell you, it is important to build buffers in the schedule, and prepare for contingencies. I did neither. And several willing, paying customers had to wait. For that, I apologize.

The Last Mile

This morning I woke up with a smile on my face. One more day to go for the book release. I smiled even more when I saw a mail from Amazon that my book had gone live. That was the good part, considering that the actual release or launch date is Friday the 29th.

But then my jaw dropped. There was some formatting error in the book description, and I had to go back and change it. (who likes to read a book blurb that has “<br><br> <br>” in between the lines? )

On a positive note, my author website http://www.amarvyas.in is live, and that went without a glitch.

Now, getting ready for the last mile.

Week of anxiety before book release

With only three days to go for the release of Now, Returned to India, I am faced with, as expected, last minute glitches. 

Website is still not up and running (hopefully that will be corrected in a day’s time), ebook is still being worked on, and we had to drop the plan of releasing print version (Createspace) and ebooks (Kindle) on the same day. The good part is, that the experience has been fantastic. 

I will post the details of the release in a day or two, till then, it is time to take a deep breath. 

Which books are selling on the Streets of Gurgaon?

Let me begin by saying that I do not buy books from peddlers who sell books on traffic junctions on the streets of Gurgaon near New Delhi, where I live. Nor is the intention of this post to promote this “trade”.

I have been observing these peddlers with great interest over the past several weeks. The books they sell very closely follow the bestseller lists one reads and hears about. This is not rocket science.  It is quite likely that someone using these peddlers as another ‘point of sale’. I have touched and felt some of these books and have noticed that the quality of paper used, printing, and binding is at par with the books published by the major trade publishers. Many of these books are wrapped in plastic cover, and are sold at nearly half their list price. Almost none of them have dog ears or any other signs that they are used.

 At two different traffic intersections this week, I saw that the following books were being sold. And to me, it is proof that these books are indeed in demand from readers. And the list is an interesting mix of both fiction and nonfiction. In a random order, the list is as follows:

 (The links point to the books or author page on Goodreads, or on Wikipedia.)

 I am left wondering: should the folks at Nielsen  Bookscan India include these sales in their rankings? And as an author, would you be excited to see your book being sold at traffic junctions? (i.e. would that be an indicator that your book is indeed selling well, even though you lose out on the royalty payments?)

On Hindi language books

This morning I was traveling by train between Pune and Mumbai, when I saw a bookstore at a railway platform. As usual, I decided to check out what was selling. It was a real eye opener. The number of Hindi language books that were stacked in the bookshop far exceeded the number of English language books.This was a stark contrast from the bookstores one finds in Malls, airports  and office buildings, which are dominated by books in English. Hindi and regional language books almost get a stepmotherly treatment.

The shopkeeper, Dinesh, was more than happy to let me take a few photographs, which I am posting below. In Hindi, there is a phrase “Jo dikhta hai, woh bikta hai.” In simple words, it means that visibility matters for sales. So if one is seeing more Hindi books than English ones, then that could confirm that in terms of sales volume, Hindi language books in India represent a much bigger  market. Just how big? I will try and assess the same in the coming weeks. And look at translating Now, Returned to India in Hindi.

Hindi books
Hindi language books
bookshop at Pune
Bookseller Dinesh at Pune Railway Station